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Manor Vellum

By Jerry Smith

A Three-Part Analytical Look at William Peter Blatty’s Faith Trilogy

Read Part 2

Adapted from his own 1983 novel, Legion, William Peter Blatty’s second and final directorial feature, The Exorcist III (1990), could very well have been a cash grab to capitalize on the infamously cherished original film. …


By Pat Brennan

Art: salahalbloushi

When I returned to writing last year, it felt like I had found a part of myself I thought was lost forever.

I had given it up back in 2015 thanks to a cocktail of disillusionment, poor mental health, and substance abuse-induced disinterest, and I thought I’d never put words to paper again. But then, after getting sober, my brain chemistry changed, and a fog lifted from my mind: the desire was back. My passion for the horror genre had never left me and there were so many movies, film scores, and other pieces of media I…


By Brian Keiper

The filmmaking team of Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead is the most exciting voice working in independent genre cinema today. Every movie they make is a masterclass in marrying expansive, even cosmic ideas with human stories. Their most recent film, Synchronic (2019), takes on the often-handled science fiction trope of time travel in a new and fascinating way. The designer drug of the title offers the unique experience of seeing time as Einstein saw it — as an illusion in which the past, present, and future all exist at the same time. …


By James Reinhardt

There are few characters who have endured in pop culture like Count Dracula, the legendary vampire who first appeared in a novel by Bram Stoker published in 1897. Though at the end of the book the heroes finish off the titular vampire with knives, that was far from the last we saw of the famed bloodsucker who would live on in a myriad of stage plays, books, movies, toys, and even breakfast cereals. During his time in the public consciousness, Dracula’s ability to change shape has extended beyond just being able to turn into a bat, and…


By Sara Century

Read Part 2

Amityville movies covered in Part 3: Amityville: It’s About Time (1992). You can purchase the Blu-Ray release of this film from Vinegar Syndrome via Diabolik DVD.

So far, the Amityville horror franchise has run the horror gamut, jumping from trend to trope and back again, delving into 3-D, moving away from the “original” house and into haunted objects, and so on. By 1992, this was a franchise hanging on by a thread with multiple sequels having put significant weight on an already sparse concept.

Then there was It’s About Time.

It’s About Time is…


By Pat Brennan

Blood was everywhere.

Small puddles of it dotted the tile floor near my wife’s hospital bed, making your shoes squeak if you happened to step in one. Splatters of the stuff dampened the sheets she lay on. And as the doctor passed me a set of surgical scissors to sever the umbilical cord that still tethered our newly born son to Norah’s life-giving body, a single drop of it hung delicately from the tool’s handle. The physician, realizing that blood from her gloves had made it to the instrument, moved to wipe the thing clean, but before…


By Jerry Smith

A Three-Part Analytical Look at William Peter Blatty’s Faith Trilogy

Read Part 1

Growing up entangled in both fear and faith throughout childhood, William Peter Blatty’s The Exorcist was a book that brought a sense of duality to the way my head and heart worked. Being a member of a strict Baptist (and the Pentecostal) family, any art I would ingest would have to be hidden under threats of church bonfires and fear tactics. …


By Billie Walker

Throughout horror, wheelchair users and the physically disabled have been collateral damage and vulnerable cannon fodder for the director’s narrative. From Joan Crawford’s frail Blanche in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), a woman completely at the mercy of her twisted sister Jane (Bette Davis), to “the disabled one” Ruben (Levente Puczkó-Smith) in Midsommar (2019), an ableist symbol of monstrosity that was an unnecessary addition to the film. …


By Brian Keiper

Read Part 2: Epiphany

Just as the second act of Wes Craven’s career began with an original and ended with a sequel (with a brief interlude starring Eddie Murphy), the third began with a seismic shift in horror and ended with a different sequel. It is difficult to overstate what a revolution Scream was in 1996. It fundamentally changed the trajectory of horror for years and its ghost(face) is still felt today. But for Craven, it was in many ways a return to his roots. As with his earliest films, Scream is a gory, real-world horror film…


By Luke Beale

Credit: Godmachine

The plot of a film is usually objective, but the themes or meanings we make of it can be entirely our own. Take Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992) for example. It’s a film about a young barrister helping an old man purchase some real estate. It’s a gothic romance about everlasting love. It’s a horror story about a monster who feeds on living blood. Take your pick. To me, it’s all those things, but it’s also about transformation.

Manor Vellum

A membrane of texts about the human condition and the horror genre. A MANOR feature. Email pitches and/or inquiries to contact@MANORHQ.com.

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